THE INSPIRED ESTHETICIAN

- a global, uplifting resource for the esthetician community hosted by Preston -
  • Home
  • PRESTON'S BLOG

PRESTON'S BLOG

  • 23 Oct 2017 12:45 PM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Treating retail as a business option instead of an essential. Whether you consider yourself a born salesperson or run from the idea of selling, salon retailing is a powerful arm of your income potential. In my own solo skincare practice it's often those product sales dollars that take an appointment day from mediocre to spectacular. Sometimes those sales are the result of a salon service, particularly facials and makeup consultations. Other times they come through walk-in product refills or online purchases from my website store. But all are generated from taking product sales seriously and working the opportunity as well as a hands-on treatment. Smart Estheticians will seek help in mastering sales skills through training. Need help with that? Look no further than my professional video "The Retail Sales Class 3-part program". It will bring real power and dollars to your daily sales totals! http://www.theinspiredesthetician.com/ONLINE-STORE

  • 18 Apr 2017 10:57 AM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Impulse purchasing at beauty trade shows. You probably know what I'm talking about: that magical walk up and down the aisles of skincare and spa shows with their fabulous displays of shiny new machines and breakthrough treatment products. Few can resist the "gotta have it!" urge that follows a gadget demo and sales pitch, or an educational class promising better skin results. The excitement of the new can quickly lead to unexpected (and unnecessary) purchases that could bust your budget or lower your business profits. Many Estheticians talk about impulsively buying products and equipment that proved to be slow sellers or lacking client demand after-the-buying-fact. There's nothing wrong with improving your skincare practice but it's always wise to slow down and think before you commit to a large or even lots of small expenditures. Remember, the money you may save is already your own!


  • 18 Apr 2017 9:19 AM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Planning ahead of knowing. Too many new and aspiring Estheticians dream BIG. They imagine a large day spa with lots of happy employees and clients. The mind envisions a national chain of skincare businesses that take care of themselves through skilled managers. Thoughts of formulating a personal skincare line with international distribution skip through the imagination. It's all so wonderful and easy in the realm of make believe. But these business paths are littered with responsibilities, financial demands and management responsibilities that can quickly turn even the brightest of dreams into dark nightmares. It's one thing to want and quite another to have. Before venturing too far down any business concept make sure that you learn as much as you can about the destination and the road leading to it. Talk to other professionals who have "been there", who understand the commitment and risks that come with the project, and be sure you're up for the task. You don't want your "opportunity" to become an unpleasant trap you'll soon regret.


  • 09 Dec 2016 7:48 PM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Starting a solo practice too early. Unless you have a fat savings account, a partner who will support you, or are willing to work some side jobs for extra cash you may not want to open an independent practice early in your career. Besides the cost of operating a solo business you are likely to lack the customers and experience of working in a well-established salon or spa. Time working for someone else at least in the first year or so will prove extremely valuable for when you are truly ready to survive on your own. Take your time, learn, make mistakes where they'll be less damaging to you, and build some customers up before setting up shop. You'll be thankful you did.

  • 05 Oct 2016 7:10 PM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Putting Treatment Education Over Business Education. No matter how many peeling, planing, product knowledge and facelift massage classes you take they won't help you manage your business wisely. Sure, it's lots more fun to learn hands-on techniques but they may come at the cost of suffering budgets, cash flow and lagging sales. The smart Esthetician knows that without business skills they'll have a much harder time supporting a place to perform face and body treatments. So, the next time you mark the classes in a trade show program make sure there is at least one business growth and management class on your list. Balance is beautiful!



  • 01 Aug 2016 12:09 PM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Charging too little for services. Sure, it may seem like a good business move to start out charging a low price for your services when you’re new to the career. But, moving those cheaper prices upward isn’t so easy once you have a clientele that’s used to a bargain. And was it really necessary to market a low price to attract business in the first place? Sometimes our lack of professional confidence in the early going convinces us to make decisions that later turned out to be as harmful to our future as it was thought to be good.

     What and who you are today sets the groundwork for who you will be tomorrow. You can’t simply morph from a low-priced Esthetician into one on top tier. The right thing to do is to decide who you want to be and then be her or him today, now, wherever you are. Yes, you’ll have to sacrifice some potential customers who don’t want to pay higher prices but, remember, the higher paying client is worth more to you in the long run. They spend more per visit and are less likely to be influenced by economic downturn or other bargain offers from your competitors. Look for them right away.

  • 10 Jul 2016 1:35 PM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Most Estheticians describe their original motivation for entering the career as one that involves helping others and making a difference in the lives of those they serve. Those are undeniably worthy reasons. But, for some, a great deal of self-sacrifice is found in that mission, and usually without necessity. This self-sacrifice takes on the form of giving away services that could have been charged for, randomly reducing prices, upgrading services without adding in the cost, and allowing their time to be dominated by customers' demands. One common and understandable reason for this behavior is insecurity or uncertainty about one's value to those they serve. It's a deep feeling that unless clients are regularly incentivized they will stop rescheduling. This leads to a sense of defeat and even being taken advantage of by customers.

    But, you can stop this. Now. Today. Forever.

    It's important to remember that once you're licensed you have the same credibility as any other skincare professional. Perhaps not the same level of experience but, in the eyes of your clients, you are the authority. Why would they choose to work with you and pay you if they believed otherwise?

    Never apologize for what you think you don't know professionally speaking. We all have to learn our trade and that takes years of treatments and customers. Still, if you have the will to put your license to practice then charge what you know (not feel) you're worth and stand by that. You'll see that no one will disagree with you and your bank account will look better, too.

    Be Inspired.

    Preston



  • 17 Jun 2016 8:40 AM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Changing locations too often. Every time you relocate your practice you will set your business back by at least a year. Even short moves can and will cause some client loss (I lost 40% of mine when I relocated 9-miles away a little over a year ago!) And, while you'll eventually recover from this the cost can hurt or, in some cases, even be financially fatal to some professionals. So, if you absolutely need to relocate choose a place you will stay at. This means really researching your new home before committing it. Then, work like crazy to get your former speed back up!


  • 10 Jun 2016 8:39 AM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    Finding Balance in Your Career and Personal Life

    Doesn’t it seem as if life really is all work and no play? Between careers, children, school and the daily demands we have where has the time to appreciate our days gone to? 

    Many professionals (and perhaps you, too) are proud of the hours they dedicate to building a business and sales. With success comes even more commits of our time, our life. But, as service providers and care givers we, too, need to restore our sense of balance and peace in order to be the best we can be for those who depend on us.

    I am a skilled meditator, having practiced various forms of it since I was 17, 45-years ago. It is one of the most beneficial, quieting and revitalizing experiences I think anyone can have. It’s simple, easy and doesn’t require special facilities, equipment or memberships. 

    Anyone can do it virtually anywhere (well, probably not while driving…) and even 15-minutes of sitting can produce powerful effects of calm and centering. It slows the world down to a manageable speed. To learn more about meditation check out: http://www.wikihow.com/Meditate-for-Beginners

     

  • 08 Jun 2016 1:52 PM | Douglas Preston (Administrator)

    One of the most common questions Estheticians that I meet and mentor ask me is, "How do I find new clients?" it's a question that's always a little hard to hear from them, mostly because there is no easy answer for it. Some advisers will crow about social media and even Groupon, but the simple (if discouraging) truth is that an Esthetician's business will slowly and steadily build over time, usually a long period of time. Steady client losses will require that new ones must forever be attracted and kept, right up close to retirement.

    The imagined magic technique that will have the phone ringing and clients pouring into the salon is pure fantasy, that is, unless you do happen to run a deep discount promotion that lures in a less-than-desirable deal seeker. There are plenty of them out there but is this the kind of customer you're looking for or can survive on? Most of those who have tried that marketing method have regretted it.

    No matter what kind of small service practice you have building up a reliable business demands years of effort, a great reputation, and constant re-proving yourself to the market. It means that if you ask too much of a new skincare practice or spa—I need to make enough money to live on NOW!—you may have set yourself up for failure, disappointment in the least. A farmer doesn't plant today in hopes of harvesting and eating the day following. What's needed is time, commitment, hard work, hope, consistency and very likely a second source of income until the practice can take over on its own.

    This is what we work on in The Inspired Esthetician Membership. We identify reality, set goals for the future, and work to achieve them with a realistic plan. There is no other way. So, settle in, look down the road, and get ready for a long ride to a great destination—eventually.


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software